Restringing

Why Should I Change My Strings?

Guitar strings have a direct relationship to how the guitar sounds and performs. Over time, guitar strings get worn and dirty, which will have an ill-effect on the tone, feel, functionality and overall life expectancy of the strings. Dirty strings will also wear down your frets faster. The oxidized dirt becomes corrosive and jagged, much like having little files grinding down on your frets while playing. Fret repair is expensive, but you can postpone that trip to the shop for a long time, just by cleaning and changing those strings regularly.

How Often Should I Change My Strings?

For strings to stay in tune, they should be changed regularly. Old, dirty strings will not hold their intonation or tune very well.

String changes should be based on the needs of the player and the condition of the strings. Many touring pros will change a set of strings either every night or every other night, but someone who plays casually at home may get three months out of a set. So, other than when they start breaking, how do you know it’s time to change them?

If you run a finger underneath the strings and feel dirt, rust, or flat spots, it is time to change them.

If your hands sweat a lot when you play, this will speed up the corrosion of the strings. You can prolong the life of the strings by simply cleaning them after each use. You can use a dry cloth to wipe them down, or you can purchase a product like The String Cleaner, which is designed to clip above and below your strings to clean them from all angles. Another method is to use a string cleaning lubricant such as Fender Speed Slick Guitar String Cleaner, MusicNomad Fuel-String Cleaner and Lubricant, the D’Addario XLR8, or GHS Fast Fret. These products are designed to clean your strings so that they are like new again, with the additional benefit of lubricating the string as well, for a lightning fast feel.

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How to Restring an Electric Guitar

How to Restring an Electric Guitar

Remove the Old Strings This is the best time to clean the guitar while also inspecting the hardware and electronics more closely. If any of the controls are noisy or intermittent, we would need access to clean them, as well as to take care of any...
How to Restring Floyd Rose Bridges

How to Restring Floyd Rose Bridges

Floyd Rose-style bridges are time consuming to restring due to their tension balanced, floating bridge system. The strings lock at the bridge and nut while the bridge floats by the balanced tension of the strings and tremolo springs. Before starting,...
How to Restring an Acoustic Guitar

How to Restring an Acoustic Guitar

Remove the Old Strings Lay the guitar down and prop up the neck, so you have access to the tuners on the headstock. You can use a rolled-up towel if you don’t have a neck rest designed for the job. Starting with either the 6th or 1st string, loosen t...
How to Restring a Classical Guitar

How to Restring a Classical Guitar

Remove the Old Strings Lay the guitar down and prop up the neck, so you have access to the tuners on the headstock. You can use a rolled-up towel if you don’t have a neck rest designed for the job. Starting with either the 6th or 1st string, loosen t...